Sierra Leone denies vice president's life is in danger

The ruling All People's Congress party denies threatening the life of Sam-Sumana who has sought asylum from the US.

    Sam-Sumana, 52, was expelled from the governing All People's Congress party this month [Reuters]
    Sam-Sumana, 52, was expelled from the governing All People's Congress party this month [Reuters]

    Sierra Leone's ruling party has denied that the vice president's life is  in danger after he sought asylum from the United States citing concerns for his personal safety.

    The All People's Congress (APC) said in a statement broadcast on state media that it had been informed of Samuel Sam-Sumana's asylum request.

    "The APC Secretariat wishes it to be known that since the expulsion of Vice President Sam-Sumana from the APC party, the party has at no point in time threatened the life of the vice president," the statement read.

    The party also denied reports that Sam-Sumana's residence had been vandalised.

    Sam-Sumana, who entered voluntary Ebola quarantine after one of his security personnel died of the disease last month, is in hiding, his whereabouts unknown.

    The US State Department said on Sunday that they are in touch with authorities in Freetown to try to resolve the political standoff between Sam-Sumana and the ruling party.

    "Our embassy in Freetown has been in contact with relevant officials, and we urge all concerned to resolve the situation through appropriate procedures that respect due process and the rule of law." Darby Holladay, a State Department spokesman, told AFP news agency.

    Holladay also said Sam-Sumana is not being sheltered in the US embassy in the capital.

    "The US can confirm that Sierra Leonean Vice President Samuel Sam-Sumana is not at the US embassy in Freetown, as some media outlets have erroneously reported," Holladay said.

    Sam-Sumana, 52, was expelled from the governing APC party this month for what was described as "his anti-party activities, including fomenting violence".

    He has denied the allegations and has appealed against his suspension to the party leadership.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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