In Pictures: Japan wins women's World Cup

Photographs of the first Asian team to ever win the Women's World Cup.

    Against all the odds, Japan announced themselves to the world as a new force in women's football by defeating the USA in the World Cup final on Sunday. The exciting final in front of a sell-out crowd in Frankfurt was a great showcase for the women's game with the Americans and Japanese battling their way into a penalty shootout. With the score tied at 2-2 after added time, Japan went on to win the shootout 3-1 when Saki Kumagai slotted the final shot high past goalkeeper Hope Solo. 

    1) Japanese players warm up prior to the final match [Johannes Eisele/AFP]

     

    2) Fans travelled to Germany from the US and Japan to support their respective sides [Christof Stache/AFP]

     

    3) The excitement was high prior to the match [Johannes Eisele/AFP]

     

    4) Japan's defender Saki Kumagai and USA's midfielder Carli Lloyd (2nd R) vie for the ball during the match [Johannes Eisele/AFP]

     

    5) Japan's goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori reaches out for the ball [Johannes Eisele/AFP]

     

    6) Homare Sawa (R) of Japan challenges Carli Lloyd of the US [Alex Domanski/Reuters]

     

    7) Japan's head coach Norio Sasaki [Alex Domanski/Reuters]

     

    8) Alex Morgan of the US celebrates after scoring against Japan [Ralph Orlowski/Reuters]

     

    9) Japan's defender Saki Kumagai (R) scores past US goalkeeper Hope Solo [Patrik Stollarz/AFP]

     

    10) The US lost 3-1 on penalty kicks [Christof Stache/AFP]

     

    11) Japanese players celebrate [Christof Stache/AFP]

     

    12) Japan's players celebrate with the trophy after the victory against the US [Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters]

     

    12) Japan fans celebrate on a street in Tokyo [Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters]

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Thou Shalt Not Kill: Israel's Hilltop Youth

    Thou Shalt Not Kill: Israel's Hilltop Youth

    Meet the hardline group willing to do anything, including going against their government, to claim land for Israel.