Award to recognise creativity in Palestine coverage

The Media Creativity Award for Palestine aims to highlight unconventional depictions of the Palestinian cause.

    The award was launched at a news conference in Beirut last month [Courtesy of the International Palestinian Conference for Media and Communications]
    The award was launched at a news conference in Beirut last month [Courtesy of the International Palestinian Conference for Media and Communications]

    Submissions have opened for an inaugural award recognising creativity in coverage of Palestine.

    The Media Creativity Award for Palestine, which will accept entries until December 31, aims to recognise "creative endeavours that contribute to achieving a deeper and better understanding of Palestine's issues in the past and present".

    The three prizes, ranging from $5,000 to the grand prize of $15,000, will be awarded to submissions that eschew "conventional or formulaic" depictions of the Palestinian cause, according to the International Palestinian Conference for Media and Communications, which is organising the contest.

    "[The goal is to] motivate media creativity serving Palestine and to recognise the achievements of creative journalists in serving this just and honourable cause," said Hisham Qasem, the forum's secretary-general.

    "It also aims to encourage the youth to make Palestine the focus of their creative endeavours and to raise the standards of innovation and originality in presenting the Palestinian narrative."

    INTERACTIVE: Palestine in Motion

    The award will be given every two years, with the inaugural session planned to celebrate Palestinian cartoonist Naji al-Ali, who was assassinated in London three decades ago. 

    Palestinian poet Mohammad al-Asaad, who wrote an introduction to a book celebrating the cartoonist's work, noted that "given his sharp vision and insightfulness, Naji can still speak to the living ... he still inspires rebellion in art and politics".

    Award submissions for written, audio, visual or digital work will be accepted from individuals and groups. The winners will be announced in spring 2018. 

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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