Preparing for problems

Kenyans cannot afford to be caught off guard by the aftermath of this election, warn activists.

    Many in Kenya blame electoral regulators, seen as weak and easily manipulated, for the violence that erupted after the 2007 vote.

    To minimise any perception of fraud, activists are working hard to ensure the image of free and fair elections is prevalent.

    "The politicians have the largest impact in terms of hate speech, as they have the largest following," said Milly Lwanga of Kenya's National Cohesion and Integration Commission. "What they have been doing now is to use more coded languages to spew hate, and that is a concern for us."

    This video is part of IRIN's "No Ordinary Election" series. Catch up with the whole special series here.

    SOURCE: IRIN


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