Malaysia football boss fights on

Sultan Ahmad Shah says changes are needed in Malaysian football, but he will stay.

    Malaysian football players leave the pitch after their
    5-0 loss against Uzbekistan at the Asian Cup [AFP]

    Sultan Ahmad Shah, Football Association of Malaysia (FAM) president, is refusing to step down despite widespread criticism of his team's poor performance at the Asian Cup.

    Malaysia, joint-hosts of the continental tournament, have played two matches in Group C based in Kuala Lumpur, losing the first 5-1 against China and the second 5-0 against Uzbekistan.

    Their final group match is arguably the toughest, as they face second-ranked Asian side Iran at the Bukit Jalil National Stadium on Wednesday.

    Sultan Ahmad said he would not follow in the footsteps of his son, Tengku Abdullah Sultan Ahmad Shah, who quit as deputy president on Sunday after Malaysia's five-goal thrashing at the hands of Uzbekistan.

    The FAM president said he would open an investigation as to why the national team has played so badly at a tournament which was supposed to draw focus to the development of football in Malaysia.

    "I will not bow to pressure, I am not a coward," Sultan Ahmad said in Malaysia daily newspaper The Star.

    "Who does not want the national team to do well at international matches? This is my responsibility. We will not run away. We are fighters.

    Your Views

    What changes do Malaysia need to make to improve?

     

    Send us your views

    "Yes, I have been quiet all this while. They thought I do not know anything. I love football and I am with the people. We were badly beaten," added the under-fire president.

    "I demand a full report of the matches against China and Uzbekistan from the manager and coach. I cannot take it. There will be changes."

    Azalina Othman Said, Sports and Youth Minister, called for a complete overhaul of Malaysian football.

    Malaysia can not qualify for the second round, but will be out to save face against Iran on Wednesday in an attempt to finish their tournament on a high.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    How the art world's hunger for ancient artefacts is destroying a centuries-old culture. A journey across the Himalayas.