Japan: What recovery looks like

How does a country recover six months after an earthquake and tsunami? This slideshow might give you an idea.

by

     

    After an earthquake and tsunami that left around 20,000 dead or missing, Japan, the world's third-largest economy, is still reeling from the blow. 

    Tourism is down, the fishing industry battered and, on top of it all, there's the issue of a nuclear meltdown at the damaged Daiichi plant in Fukushima - and the energy shortage that accompanies it - to contend with.

    I was in Japan in March, right after the earthquake and tsunami struck (and just as the Daiichi plant was burning, exploding, and kicking out all kinds of smoke), when things looked at their worst.

    Six months on, I'm back. What I'm seeing is a country pushing forward with the mighty task of repairing communities and lives up and down its northeast coast while trying to come to terms with its energy consumption and what it means to have 54 nuclear power plants on its seismically active land.

     


    [Photos by D. Parvaz/Al Jazeera]


    ABOUT THE AUTHOR



    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Take a tour through East and West Jerusalem to see the difference in quality of life for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.