Capitalising on Mandela health scare

Some South Africans use Mandela's hospital stay as an opportunity to make a quick buck from journalists.

by

    It was bound to happen - ordinary South Africans have found ways to capitalise economically on Nelson Mandela's latest health scare. 

    The hospital which the former president of South Africa is believed to be treated in is located in a fairly busy part of Pretoria.

    Foreign and local journalists are parked opposite the health facility - some are even sleeping here. We have put up tents, brought pillows and blankets, tables and chairs. A few even have camper vans.

    Most of us don't dare to leave the street or stray too far in case we miss the "breaking news" or something.

    Ordinary South Africans keen on making money were quick to realise this. They've started coming to us, the journalists.

    One family is renting out their balcony overlooking the parking lot of the hospital for around $350 a day.

    Others are hiring out their cars and buses to journalists - offering to ferry the media hounds to and from the hospital and carry the camera equipment flown in from all over the world.

    There are no good restaurants or fast food places nearby, so one company started distributing pamphlets on Tuesday, offering to deliver meals to journalists camping outside the hospital.

    Now all we need are toilets, water and someone to provide tea, coffee and hot chocolate. It's the middle of winter and freezing cold out here, especially at night.

    I wonder what bright spark will come up with a plan to supply these much needed services to journalists eager to pay for a little comfort?


    ABOUT THE AUTHOR



    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    Interactive: Coding like a girl

    What obstacles do young women in technology have to overcome to achieve their dreams? Play this retro game to find out.

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    Why America's Russia hysteria is dangerous

    The US exaggerating and obsessing about foreign threats seems quite similar to what is happening in Russia.

    Heron Gate mass eviction: 'We never expected this in Canada'

    Hundreds face mass eviction in Canada's capital

    About 150 homes in one of Ottawa's most diverse and affordable communities are expected to be torn down in coming months