They wouldn't dare ban the vuvuzela - would they?

Frustrated World Cup watchers make contingency plans to view matches without noise of ubiquitous horns.

    Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has condemned the call to ban vuvuzelas at World Cup stadiums. In fact, he called it "nonsense" – football fans must realise that they are in South Africa and that's the way the country watches matches.

    But people are complaining they cannot hear each other during games.

    I don't particularly care for the vuvuzela – I can't even blow the thing properly. But this is an African world cup - the first ever in the history of the tournament  - so why not go along with the flow?

    There are coping mechanisms for people at the stadium and the public viewing areas, or fan parks: bring a pair of ear plugs. That's what I would do.

    Besides, imagine the backlash from angry South Africans if their vuvuzela was banned from the stadiums? That is a risk Fifa may not want to take.

    But obviously enough people are irritated by the plastic object - and are making contingency plans.

    A French cable TV channel is offering vuvuzela-free broadcasts for all matches at the World Cup. Using frequency-separating technology, they have managed to block out the vuvuzela's buzzing drone while letting other sounds come through.

    But all the hype may be much ado about nothing.

    I predict once South Africa is out of the tournament – we will know this coming Tuesday when they play France – South Africans won't feel like blowing their vuvuzelas much anyway.


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