Iran offers to share missile technology | News | Al Jazeera

Iran offers to share missile technology

Iran is ready to share its missile systems and missiles including cluster warheads with its friends and neighbours, the commander of the Revolutionary Guards has said.

    Safavi: "We have weapons which are unknown to others"

    Iran was also prepared to repel any US attack, Yahya Rahim Safavi, the guards' commander-in-chief, told Iran's Arabic-language Al-Alam TV on Sunday.

     

    "We are able to give our missile systems to friendly and neighbouring countries," Safavi told Al-Alam.

     

    "Under the current circumstances, Americans are involved in Afghanistan and the quagmire of Iraq so we do not anticipate any military attack from America," he said.

     

    "But Iran has its own defence and deterrent power and it is very unlikely that America will cause us any problems. They know that Iran has missiles with the range of 2,000 km which will put their interests in danger," Safavi said.

     

    The US has said it wants to resolve a dispute over Iran's nuclear programme by diplomatic means, but has not ruled out the use of force.

     

    Revolutionary guards

               

    Safavi's warnings came as Iran conducted a 10-day military exercise, during which the Revolutionary Guards said they fired Shahab missiles with cluster warheads.

     

    Experts say the Shahab 3 has a maximum range of 2,000 km, able to hit Israel and US bases in the Persian Gulf.

    Iran tested long-range missiles during its latest war games

       

    "We have weapons which are unknown to others. We have military weapons which we have not shown off, but we will do in the next manoeuvres," Safavi said, without giving details.

       

    Iran frequently reports tests of new weapons systems, but experts say it rarely gives enough detail to make clear if any significant advances have been made.

     

    The US dismissed the manoeuvres, which began last Thursday, as "sabre-rattling".

     

    Suicide troops trained and ready

       

    Safavid also told Iranian television that the Revolutionary Guards had trained thousands of troops for suicide missions to defend Iran, although he said any US attack was unlikely.

     

    "The Revolutionary Guards does not only depend on its technological might because it has thousands of martyrdom seekers and they are ready for martyrdom-seeking operations on a large scale," Safavi said.

       

    "They are professionals, they receive training and have the spirit."

       

    Analysts say Iran's technology may not match that possessed by US and other forces operating in the region, but they say Iran could still cause havoc in the strategic Gulf waterway, particularly with guerrilla-style tactics.

     

    Most of Iran's home-grown weapons systems are modified version of weapons supplied by other countries, including North Korea, experts have said.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


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