Afghan violence claims more lives

Fresh violence in Afghanistan involving Taliban fighters has left five people dead, including a foreign soldier.

    A foreign soldier was killed in Kandahar

    The soldier with Nato's International Security Assistance Force [ISAF] was killed on Monday when a bomb struck a military vehicle travelling through the southern province of Kandahar, Nato said on Tuesday.

    "One ISAF soldier died and two were injured when the vehicle they were travelling in was struck by an improvised explosive device [IED] in the Panjwayi district of Kandahar yesterday," a statement read. 

          

    An Afghan soldier was killed the same day when another IED struck a military patrol in the Gereshk area of neighbouring Helmand  province, Andre Salloum, an ISAF spokesman said.

      

    "A vehicle went over an IED which was on the road. One vehicle was damaged and had to be destroyed," he said.

      

    In the eastern province of Khost meanwhile, Taliban fighters  attacked a highway police post just after midnight on Monday.

     

    Two attackers and a policeman were killed in an ensuing gunfight, provincial  police said

     

    Pashtun protest

     

    Several thousand ethnic Pashtuns rallied in a Pakistani town near the Afghan border on Tuesday, accusing Pakistan of meddling in Afghanistan's affairs.

       

    The protesters, Pakistani Pashtuns and some Afghan Pashtun refugees, accused Pakistan of providing sanctuary to Taliban fighters.

       

    "We demand the government of Pakistan stops playing its game in Afghanistan," Hamid Khan Achakzai, a leader of a Pakistani Pashtun nationalist party and a former member of parliament, told the rally in the southwestern town of Chaman.

       

    "This duplicitous policy poses serious danger to the entire world," Achakzai said.

       

    Pashtuns live on both sides of the rugged Afghan-Pakistani border.

       

    Afghan complaints that Taliban fighters are operating from safe havens on the Pakistani side have seriously strained relations between the neighbours this year.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera + Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.