Turkish resort bombings continue

Three people have been killed and dozens injured in a bomb blast in the centre of Antalya, a city popular with foreign tourists in southern Turkey.

    A series of bombs has hit Turkish resorts in recent days

    The new blast on Monday evening came less than 24 hours after four bombs in the coastal tourist resort of Marmaris and in Istanbul injured 27 people, including 10 British tourists.

    Two days ago two more bombs exploded in the southern Turkish city of Adana, injuring four people.

    A group called the Kurdistan Freedom Falcons claimed in a statement on its website that it had carried out the attacks in Marmaris and Istanbul.

    "Nothing in Turkey will be as it was before," the group said on its website.

    Kurdish separatists, left-wing groups and Islamic militants have carried out bomb attacks in Turkey in the past.

    Turkish suspicions had fallen on the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) which has previously carried out similar bombings.

    Some analysts believe that the Kurdistan Freedom Falcons group is linked to the PKK or is made up of former PKK members.

    The PKK launched its armed campaign for an independent Kurdish homeland in 1984.

    The United States and European Union consider the group a terrorist organisation and blame it for the deaths of more than 30,000 people.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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