Pakistan foils 'train terror attack'

Police in Pakistan have arrested a man they say is an Indian national who stole a railway engine and tried to drive it into a passenger train in an attempted "terror attack".

    The alleged plot invloved ramming an engine into a train

    The man drove the locomotive at full speed for 35km before officials derailed it and averted a possible disaster late on Tuesday, police in the southern city of Karachi said.

    Irshad Beg, a railway police official, identified the arrested man as Madan Lal, who is in his 50s.
      
    "We suspect that he stole the engine and drove it on the track to cause a terrorist attack," Beg said.
      
    Lal's apparent target was a regular passenger service that was on the same track before it was diverted, the police official said.
      
    Two Pakistani men, a driver and a fireman, were also arrested for negligence, Beg said.
      
    Lal told AFP in custody that he was a Pakistani citizen and stole the engine just to have a ride on the track. He refused to answer other questions.
     
    Beg said the suspect would be produced before a local court and a thorough medical examination may be conducted to determine his mental health.
      
    "He does not have anything to prove that he is a Pakistani citizen and we suspect him to be from the Indian state of Hyderabad," Beg said.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Meet the deported nurse aiding asylum seekers at US-Mexico border

    Meet the deported nurse helping refugees at the border

    Francisco 'Panchito' Olachea drives a beat-up ambulance around Nogales, taking care of those trying to get to the US.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.