Kewell out with gout

Socceroo playmaker Harry Kewell was struck down with gout after starring in his side’s draw with Croatia, and was unable to take part in Australia’s quarter final loss to Italy on Monday.

    Too much good living?

    Many believed that the Liverpool player’s groin injury had flared up causing him to enter the Fritz-Walter stadium in Kaiserslautern on crutches, however the cause was gout that can occur when there is a high content of uric acid in the blood which accumulates as crystal in the joints causing acute pain.

    "Harry is a shot duck. He has never been in so much pain all his life," said Kewell's manager Bernie Mandic.

    "He's had the game of his life for the Socceroos, and then been shot down by this. It's unbelievable."

    The absences of the in-form midfielder and wingback Brett Emerton were telling to Australia’s chances against the Italians, as even when up against 10 men they never really threatened to score.

    Post mortems of the match intimate that coach Guus Hiddink could maybe have pushed for the win with the opposition a man down, and been more aggressive with his tactics by bringing on striker John Aloisi earlier as well as towering target man Josh Kennedy.

    However, that is all history now and Australia’s tournament is over along with Kewell’s, who will now be focusing on getting back into fitness for his club side Liverpool and the new English Premier League season.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    How the art world's hunger for ancient artefacts is destroying a centuries-old culture. A journey across the Himalayas.