Deadly stampede in Karachi

A stampede at a religious gathering in Pakistan has left at least 29 people dead, most of them women and children, police say.

    The stampede occurred as thousands left a relgious centre

    The incident occured at the Sunni Muslim Faizan-e-Medina centre in the southern port city of Karachi on Sunday afternoon.

    As many as 70 others people were injured in the crush, hospital and police officials said.

    Zahid Hussain, a Karachi police spokesman, said thousands of women were leaving for a rally after attending the gathering to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad, which falls on Tuesday.

    "A girl was coming out of the mosque ... when she fell down, triggering a stampede," Hussain added.

    As she fell she had cried out, sparking the panic.

    He said up to 50,000 people, mostly women and children had gathered for the ceremony.

    A doctor at the state-run Jinnah Post-Graduate Medical Centre, said most of the deaths were caused by internal injuries and suffocation.

    "Many of the victims are women and children," Dr Simi Jamali said.

    Survivors in hospital described how the scene quickly descended into chaos as participants at the ceremony struggled to reach safety.

    "Women fell on each other as panic spread," one woman said. "It was absolute mayhem. Nobody knew what had happened".

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.