Chad not to expel Darfur refugees

Chad has told the United Nations that about 200,000 refugees from Sudan's Darfur will not be expelled despite an earlier warning that they might have to go in June.

    About 200,000 refugees from Darfur are in eastern Chad

    The UN High Commissioner for Refugees, UNHCR, said in a statement on Monday that Idriss Deby, the president of Chad, who accuses Sudan of backing rebels that attacked the capital N'Djamena last week, had promised that nobody would be forced to leave.

    Antonio Guterres said: "I ... am pleased to report that he (Deby) has reaffirmed that refugees will not be 'refouled' (forcibly returned) and Chad will abide by international principles."

    But Guterres, who spoke to Deby on Sunday night, said the Chad leader had repeated his concerns about the difficulty of providing security for the refugees and the humanitarian organisations that were helping them.

    "UNHCR strongly appeals to the international community and its various organisations to do everything possible to urgently establish peace and security in Darfur," the former Portuguese prime minister said in the statement.

    Last Thursday's attack on the capital was the boldest yet by rebels who have pledged to end Deby's nearly 16-year rule and block a May 3 presidential poll in which he is standing for re-election.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.