Another find in Valley of the Kings

Through a partially opened underground door, Egyptian authorities have peeked into the first new tomb uncovered in the Valley of the Kings since that of King Tutankhamun in 1922.

    The tomb was found in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

    US archaeologists on Friday said they discovered the tomb by accident while working on a nearby site.

     

    Still unknown is whose mummies are in the five wooden sarcophagi with painted funeral masks, surrounded by alabaster jars inside the undecorated single-chamber

    tomb.

     

    The tomb, believed to be some 3000 years old, dating to the 18th Dynasty, does not appear to be that of a pharaoh, said Edwin Brock, co-director of the University of Memphis that discovered the site.

     

    No royal tomb

     

    Brock said: "I don't think it's a royal tomb, maybe members of the court. Contemporaries of Tutankhamun are possible - or of Amunhotep III or even

    Horemheb."

     

    Zahi Hawass, Egypt's antiquities chief, said: "Maybe they are mummies of kings or queens or nobles, we don't know. But it's definitely someone connected to the royal

    family."

     

    "It could be the gardener," Schaden joked to Hawass at the site. "But it's somebody who had the favour of the king because not everybody could come and make their tomb in the Valley of the Kings."

     

    So far, archaeologists have not entered the tomb, having only opened part of its 1.5-metre-high entrance door last week. But they have peered inside the single chamber

    to see the sarcophagi, believed to contain mummies, surrounded by around 20 pharaonic jars.

    SOURCE: Unspecified


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Take a tour through East and West Jerusalem to see the difference in quality of life for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.