Kimchi to help ward off bird flu

South Korean firm LG Electronics is to start marketing an air conditioner with a filter made using an enzyme from the pungent national dish kimchi that is aimed at protecting against the bird flu virus.

    Researchers are also testing kimchi as an additive to bird feed

    Kimchi, typically made from pickled radish or cabbage packed with garlic, ginger and hot peppers, is renowned for its supposed health benefits - as well as its powerful odour.

    "We developed the filter with the aim of protecting people against bird flu," Park Se-won, LG spokeswoman, said by telephone, citing four studies from domestic and overseas institutions that she said showed that the filter eliminated the deadly H5N1 virus.

    Over the years, kimchi has frequently been billed, particularly in Korean culture, as a miracle food with an amazing array of health benefits.

    During the Sars crisis in 2003, many Koreans believed eating kimchi helped to ward off the disease.

    Little evidence

    Researchers in South Korea have been testing whether an extract from kimchi can be used as an additive to chicken feed to prevent bird flu, although there has been little scientific evidence to support the claim.

    "Since the filters are made with only the enzyme extracted from kimchi, the smell doesn't follow"

    Park Se-won
    LG spokeswoman

    LG, which is the world's largest manufacturer of air conditioners, intends to start marketing the air conditioners in China and Southeast Asia soon.

    She said appliances would not transmit the unmistakable kimchi smell through rooms.

    "Since the filters are made with only the enzyme extracted from kimchi, the smell doesn't follow."

    The H5N1 avian flu virus has killed 91 people since late 2003, the majority of them in Asia.

    Though the virus remains hard for people to catch, scientists say it is steadily mutating and could acquire the ability to pass easily between people, triggering a pandemic.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.