MS looks at Vista beyond Windows

Microsoft is looking past Windows and taking a long view of its future by naming its next-generation operating system "Vista," officials from the US software behemoth said.

    Microsoft expects to release a polished version of Vista by 2006

    Mircrosoft officials said on Friday they would reveal details of the new platform on 3 August, when it is to be given to 100,000 Microsoft devotees for "beta" testing.

     

    "We live in a world of 'more'," Microsoft said in a written release. "More information, more ways to communicate, more things to do, more opportunities and, at the same time, more responsibilities."

     

    "At the end of the day, what you're after is a way to break through all the clutter to focus on what you want to focus on," the statement continued, noting people are increasingly turning to their computers get things done.

     

    "What you're trying to get is your own personal vista, whether that is trying to organise photos, find a file, or connect and collaborate with a number of people electronically."


    Refined version
     

    Feedback from the beta testing will be used to create a more refined version.

    Feedback from beta testing will
    be used to refine the product

    The company reportedly expects a polished version of Vista to be released late in 2006, missing its original target date by about a year.

     

    Vista will replace the Windows XP operating system released in late 2001.

     

    "That's the role that Windows has always played - empowering people to use technology to do and accomplish what they want," the Microsoft release maintained.

    "But the world has evolved, and there's a lot more out there so we have to make some investments and make sure that we continue to play that role.

    SOURCE: AFP


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