Rabat pulls Aljazeera reporter's permit

The Moroccan authorities have withdrawn the reporting permit for Aljazeera's correspondent in Rabat, Abd al-Salam Razaq.

    Abd al-Salam Razaq was accused of Polisario sympathies

    The Moroccan Ministry of Communications in a statement to the official news agency, MAP, said Razaq had violated the code of professional ethics by airing false news.

    The decision to cancel Razaq's permit was made after Aljazeera aired an interview in Paris with a Polisario activist who accused the Moroccan authorities of abducting pro-independence activist Ali Salem Tamek.
     
    The Moroccan authorities have denied abducting Tamek, saying he was summoned by the judicial authorities for interrogation on charges of involvement last month in riots in Laayoun, the largest town in Western Sahara.

    Accusation
     
    The director of the Communications Ministry, Fatiha al-Ayadi, told Aljazeera that it was not the first time Razaq had violated the code of ethics and accused him of  sympathising with the separatists.

    The Moroccan official also said Razaq had exploited his position in Aljazeera to promote a "separatist message".

    "In his report about the Western Sahara, Razaq had stated the separatists' point of view and neglected the Moroccan version though the channel's motto is 'Opinion and counter opinion'," Ayadi said.
     
    Asked about the news branded by the Moroccan ministry as false or in breach of the ethics code, the official repeated her charge of what she said was "promoting a separatist message", without giving examples of violating the code of professional ethics or what the Moroccan authorities described as false news stories.

    The Moroccan authorities in June also cancelled the reporting permit of Aljazeera reporter Iqbal Ilhami.

    SOURCE: Aljazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.