Civilians killed in south Thai attacks

Two people have been killed and four others wounded in a bombing and a shooting in Thailand's Muslim south.

    About 700 Thais have died in over a year of insurgency

    Police said on Monday that one bomb exploded around 7am near Sun-ngai Padi police station in Narathiwat province, killing a rubbish collector and wounding his two colleagues and a police officer.
      
    Police said they were investigating where the bomb was planted - inside the waste-disposal truck or near the police station's entrance - its type and how it was detonated.
      
    Many of the nearly daily bombings in the southern provinces have been triggered by mobile phones, leading the authorities to register sales of pre-paid mobile phone services. 
      
    Second explosion

    Another bomb exploded around 6.45am at a commercial bank in Narathiwat's Waeng district.

    Police inspect damage

    in front of
    the Sungai Padi police station

    No one was injured, but the bomb damaged the bank's front doors. Police do not know exactly where the bomb was planted or whether any money was stolen.
      
    At least 700 people have died since January 2004, when an insurgency began that police say is a volatile mix of Islamic separatist unrest as well as organised crime and smuggling.
      
    The killings originally targeted security forces and government officials but have spread to teachers and other civil servants, Buddhist monks, and Buddhist and Muslim civilians such as farmers and shop owners. 

    Shooting

    Meanwhile, in nearby Pattani province, Buddhist twin brothers were shot with an M-16 while riding their motorcycle home from school, police said.

    One boy was killed instantly and the other was wounded.

    The government has imposed martial law in parts of the three southernmost provinces to curb the violence, which first erupted in January 2004 when gunmen raided army barracks and stole 400 assault rifles, including M-16s.

    Shootings, bombings and arson attacks have since become daily occurrences.

    However, authorities in the mainly Muslim region, which has a century-long history of often violent opposition to the Buddhist government in Bangkok, appear no closer to bringing an end to the unrest or identifying its masterminds.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    Learn what India's parties' symbols mean by drawing them

    More than 2,300 political parties have registered for the largest electoral exercise in the world.

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Visualising every Saudi coalition air raid on Yemen

    Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and a coalition of Arab states have launched more than 19,278 air raids across Yemen.

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    Why did Bush go to war in Iraq?

    No, it wasn't because of WMDs, democracy or Iraqi oil. The real reason is much more sinister than that.