Syria denies Israeli arms accusation

Syria has denied Israeli claims of developing weapons of mass destruction and raised the question of Israel's own nuclear arsenal.

    Syria raised the question of Israel's nuclear arsenal

    Syria's information minister has denounced Israeli claims his country is developing new weapons and had test-fired Scud missiles, calling the accusations an "expression of Israel's hostile intentions".

    In remarks carried by Syria's official news agency, Mahdi Dakhl Allah said the Israeli allegations were part of a pressure campaign against Syria.

    Dakhl Allah raised the question of Israel's nuclear arsenal and said Syria is within its rights to be in possession of defence weapons.

    "It's normal for a state to possess all defence potentials, especially if it is in a region shrouded with tension, aggression and continuous Israeli occupation, in addition to Israel's unbridled desire to expand the circle of aggression and occupation," he said.

    Israel's nuclear arsenal

    He said Israel's nuclear arsenal posed a danger and called on the international community to rid the region of weapons of mass destruction.

    "It's normal for a state to possess all defence potentials, especially if it is in a region shrouded with tension, aggression and continuous Israeli occupation"

    Mahdi Dakhl Allah

    Israeli military officials said that Syria had test-fired three Scud missiles.

    They said one of the missiles broke up over Turkey.

    The Turkish military said apparent missile debris from Syria landed on two agricultural villages in the southern province of Hatay, causing no injuries or damage.

    A Turkish Foreign Ministry official said Syria had apologised for the incident and assured Turkey it was "an accident" that occurred during routine military training.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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