Saudi law to jail phone porn users

Anyone using camera phones to distribute pornography may face up to 1000 lashes, a 12-year jail term and a 100,000 riyal ($26,670) fine under a proposed Saudi Arabian law, newspapers have reported.

    Camera phone use has caused fights at schools and weddings

    The law comes after a Saudi court in January

    sentenced three men to jail and up to 1200 lashes each for

    orchestrating and filming the rape of a teenage girl using

    telephones equipped with cameras and distributing the footage

    via the telephones.

    The conservative Muslim kingdom's consultative 150-member

    Shura council was expected to endorse the new law soon, local

    newspapers said on Saturday.

    The state telecommunications regulator this year

    warned against using third generation (3G) mobile phones for

    immoral purposes.

    The 3G mobile phones can access the internet, which is strictly

    controlled in Saudi Arabia, and receive high-quality video clips

    from adult sites.

    A ban was recently overturned on the import and sale of

    mobile camera phones. Religious leaders said they were used to

    invade privacy, particularly of women.

    The use of camera phones has triggered scuffles at weddings

    and girls' schools after handsets were used to film and

    distribute pictures of unveiled women, newspapers have reported.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.