Saudi law to jail phone porn users

Anyone using camera phones to distribute pornography may face up to 1000 lashes, a 12-year jail term and a 100,000 riyal ($26,670) fine under a proposed Saudi Arabian law, newspapers have reported.

    Camera phone use has caused fights at schools and weddings

    The law comes after a Saudi court in January

    sentenced three men to jail and up to 1200 lashes each for

    orchestrating and filming the rape of a teenage girl using

    telephones equipped with cameras and distributing the footage

    via the telephones.

    The conservative Muslim kingdom's consultative 150-member

    Shura council was expected to endorse the new law soon, local

    newspapers said on Saturday.

    The state telecommunications regulator this year

    warned against using third generation (3G) mobile phones for

    immoral purposes.

    The 3G mobile phones can access the internet, which is strictly

    controlled in Saudi Arabia, and receive high-quality video clips

    from adult sites.

    A ban was recently overturned on the import and sale of

    mobile camera phones. Religious leaders said they were used to

    invade privacy, particularly of women.

    The use of camera phones has triggered scuffles at weddings

    and girls' schools after handsets were used to film and

    distribute pictures of unveiled women, newspapers have reported.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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