Opposition paper hits stands in Egypt

A newspaper run by an opposition party whose jailed leader recently announced plans to run for Egypt's presidency, has been allowed to hit the stands for the first time.

    Egyptians read the first edition of the opposition Al-Ghad weekly

    The weekly Al-Ghad, or Tomorrow, which carries the same name as the party, ran its first edition on Wednesday.

    It was due to appear last month, but differences among senior party members over who would be its editor is said to be behind the delay.

    The first edition carried the decision of the party leader Ayman Nur to take part in Egypt's first multi-candidate presidential elections later this year.

    His wife said on Tuesday that Egyptian authorities had earlier blocked distribution of the first issue of the newspaper because of her husband's publication of  his intention to run for the presidency.

    The newspaper also ran a full page article on the amendment, saying opposition parties faced difficulties presenting a competitive candidate.

    Nur,40, was detained late January on allegations of forging nearly 2000 signatures to secure a license for his party.

    He denies the accusation and Washington, major US newspapers, and international human rights groups have protested against his arrest.

    The paper said the forgery allegations against Nur were a conspiracy hatched by an intelligence officer.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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