Egyptian spy given 35 years

An Egyptian national has been sentenced to 35 years in prison after a Cairo court found him guilty of spying for the Iranian Revolutionary Guard and planning to assassinate Egyptian President Husni Mubarak.

    The defendant was found guilty of espionage

    The court on Sunday gave Mahmud Dabbus 10 years in prison for spying for a foreign state and another 25 years for plotting to kill Mubarak.

    The court also sentenced in absentia Iranian diplomat Muhammad Hosseindost to 25 years in prison for recruiting Dabbus and plotting terror attacks and political assassinations in Egypt.

    Dabbus said during his trial that he made confessions under pressure about planning to kill the president.

    "This is unfair. I'm innocent," Dabbus said after the sentence was announced, claiming to reporters that he had been promised a presidential pardon if he cooperated with the investigation.

    "The holding of such a show trial was only aimed at pleasing the Zionist regime. The Egyptian judiciary should instead look into the problems in their own country"

    Hamid Reza Asefi,
    Foreign Ministry spokesman

    Judge Adil Abd al-Salam Jumaa of the state security court, who announced the sentences, denied that such a promise had been made.

    Iran, which has denied the allegations, has not had full diplomatic ties with Egypt since the Iranian revolution in 1979, when Tehran broke off relations because Egypt had signed a peace treaty with Israel.

    Hosseindost worked in the Iranian interests office in Cairo.

    Iranian reaction

    Iran immediately rejected what it said was the "ridiculous" sentencing and accused Egyptian authorities of only seeking to please Israel.

    "This entire scenario was baseless from the very beginning and void of any evidence," Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said in a statement carried by official media.

    "The holding of such a show trial was only aimed at pleasing the Zionist regime. The Egyptian judiciary should instead look into the problems in their own country," Asefi added.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    What draws Kenyan women to join al-Shabab and what challenges are they facing when they return to their communities?