Kazakhstan party office bombed

Two powerful blasts have rocked the headquarters of President Nursultan Nazarbayev's ruling Otan (Fatherland) party in Almaty's central district.

    President Nursultan Nazarbayev has been in power since 1989

    A spokeswoman for the Emergencies Agency and witnesses said on Sunday they heard one blast followed by another five minutes later.

    The headquarters sits on a busy thoroughfare in the centre of Kazakhstan's commercial capital.

     

    "As far as we know, the blasts have hit the Otan headquarters," the spokeswoman said, declining to give details.

     

    Alexander Pavlov, an Otan deputy chairman, confirmed that the headquarters had been hit by explosions but declined to comment further.

     

    It was not immediately clear what had caused the blasts, though the area was quickly swarming with special forces and plainclothes officers, who cordoned off the three-storey building.


    Intimidation

    In September, the Otan party and its allies won all but one of the seats in parliamentary elections that the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe said were marred by intimidation and fell short of democratic standards.

     

    The lone opposition deputy has since resigned in protest against what he called a rigged and falsified poll.

     

    In power since 1989, Nazarbayev wields almost unlimited power, and though he has reformed the oil-rich Central Asian state's ex-Soviet economy, Kazakhstan has never yet held a vote judged free and fair.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Take a tour through East and West Jerusalem to see the difference in quality of life for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.