Indonesia blast targets Australian embassy

A huge explosion just outside the Australian embassy in Indonesia's capital has killed at least three people and injured many more.

    Indonesian police have already begun an investigation

    The blast in the busy Kuningan district in South Jakarta on Thursday morning damaged the security fence around the embassy and destroyed cars parked inside the compound.

    Local journalists said they had seen at least three dead bodies at the scene. They also reported that embassy staff and residents suffered injuries from flying shards of glass when the explosion shattered dozens of office windows.

    The blast was heard from as far as two kilometres. A resident in Tebet, about two kilometres away, said she felt the ground shook.

    Investigation

    The Jakarta Police Chief Inspector General Firman Gani has already begun an investigation.

    Australia's foreign affairs department has warned its citizens against non-essential travel to the fourth most populous nation in the world.

    PM John Howard told journalists that although it was unclear who was responsible for the blast, it appears to have been caused by a car bomb.

    Indonesia has been hit by sporadic bomb attacks in recent years, including blasts in Bali in October 2002 that killed 202 people and at a luxury Jakarta hotel in August 2003 that killed 12 - all of which police linked to the outlawed Islamist group, the Jemaah Islamiya.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.

    Pakistan's tribal areas: 'Neither faith nor union found'

    Pakistan's tribal areas: 'Neither faith nor union found'

    Residents of long-neglected northwestern tribal belt say incorporation into Pakistan has left them in a vacuum.