US opposes second term for Lahud

The United States has voiced its opposition to another term for Lebanese President Emile Lahud, saying it would violate the country’s constitution.

    Lebanese President Lahud (l) is willing to accept a second term

    Lahud – a close ally of Syria – had earlier on Tuesday made it clear he was willing to stand for another term, despite stiff opposition to changing the constitution which would be need to allow him to do so.

     

    "If a parliamentary majority wishes to bestow this mission upon me again, then I am ready to accept," Lahud said in Damascus.

    But Adam Ereli, deputy US State Department spokesman said his country strongly supports a free and fair electoral process in Lebanon, but in accordance with the already established Lebanese constitution.

    "That constitution provides for a new president every six years, selected by parliament,” said Ereli. “The election of a president is a decision for the Lebanese people alone to make, consistent with their established constitution".

     

    "It is our view that no outside country should interfere in the process, but as a matter of policy the United States does not take a position on individual candidates…the decision of who is the president of Lebanon is a decision for the Lebanese people – not for the Syrians, not for the Americans, not for anybody else."

    A growing number of Lebanese religious and political figures are opposed to Lahud standing for re-election because, under the constitution as it stands, a president is not allowed to stand for a second successive term.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Meet the deported nurse aiding asylum seekers at US-Mexico border

    Meet the deported nurse helping refugees at the border

    Francisco 'Panchito' Olachea drives a beat-up ambulance around Nogales, taking care of those trying to get to the US.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.