Advertising for a liver transplant

A Texas man suffering from cancer has launched an innovative campaign to attract potential organ donors for a liver transplant he needs to save his life.

    About 70 organ transplants are done daily in the US

    While two billboards reading "I need a liver – Please help save my life" have gone up along Houston's highways in recent days to find a donor for Todd Krampitz, 32, he and his wife have also bought newspaper advertisements.

    They have posted their story on a web site,

    www.toddneedsaliver.com

    , with updates on his condition and possible donors.

    "Todd's only hope for survival is a liver transplant," the Web site says. He was diagnosed with cancer last May.

    Short supply

    About 70 organ transplants are done every day in the United States, but another 16 people on waiting lists die each day because of a lack of organs, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services.

    Annie Moore, spokeswoman for the United Network for Organ Sharing said there were about 17,471 patients waiting for liver transplants in the US.

    Krampitz is seeking a donor, who would specify that his or her liver go directly to him.

    Moore said the publicity around Krampitz's case was welcome.

    "It does bring increased awareness to the critical shortage of organs".

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Pie peace: My last argument with my sister

    Pie peace: My last argument with my sister

    In a family of 13 siblings, Lori was militant in her maternal agenda; making prom dresses and keeping watch over pie.

    From the US to Afghanistan: Rediscovering the mother who left me

    From the US to Afghanistan: Rediscovering the mother who left me

    Tracee Herbaugh's mother, Sharon, abandoned her when she was born, pursuing a career from which she never returned.

    Could mega-dams kill the mighty River Nile?

    Could mega-dams kill the mighty River Nile?

    For Ethiopia, a new dam holds the promise of much-needed electricity; for Egypt, the fear of a devastating water crisis.