US extends new passport deadline

The United States has given countries with visa-waiver agreements an extra year to start issuing passports with biometric measures such as fingerprints.

    Most visitors are fingerprinted and photographed on arrival

    The 27 nations affected, which include close allies like the UK, Japan and Australia, now have until 26 October 2005 to start issuing the passports under a US law designed to tighten border security after the September 11 attacks.

    The Bush administration sought an extension after concluding most of the countries, whose citizens are generally permitted to visit the US without a visa for up to 90 days, would miss the original 26 October 2004 deadline.

    In April, the Bush administration said it would begin fingerprinting and photographing visitors from visa-waiver countries, extending a policy that applies to most foreigners who visit the US.

    The extension applies to Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    All Hail The Algorithm

    All Hail The Algorithm

    A five-part series exploring the impact of algorithms on our everyday lives.

    The priceless racism of the Duke of Edinburgh

    The priceless racism of the Duke of Edinburgh

    Prince Philip has done the world an extraordinary service by exposing the racist hypocrisy of "Western civilisation".

    China will determine the future of Venezuela

    China will determine the future of Venezuela

    There are a number of reasons why Beijing continues to back Maduro's government despite suffering financial losses.