Iraq 'not healthy enough' for GCC

Don't expect Iraq to join the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), says Iraq's president. At least not yet.

    Yawar doesn't want Iraq to be a burden on neighbours

    It is unrealistic for Iraq to ask to join the six-member council due to the current political situation said Iraqi President Shaikh Ghazi al-Yawar on Wednesday.

    "I believe this request is unrealistic," Yawar told reporters in Baghdad after meeting with members of the country's new appeals court.

    "We in Iraq are not in a position that would allow us to impose upon our brothers (such a request)."

    He said Iraq faces a lot of problems and is in no position to join "a very organised and healthy body," like the GCC, which groups Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    Economic quarantine

    Yawar likened a request by Iraq to join the GCC to someone with a severe cold asking to come into your home.

    "Maybe, in the future, when Iraq recovers, by then, these countries will be ready to accept the democratic Iraq. We will play an important role," he said.

    The GCC and its member countries have welcomed the interim government installed by US-led occupying forces.

    Before Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait in 1991 and the end of diplomatic ties between Iraq and the GCC states, Baghdad was granted the status of observer during some of the council's summits and meetings.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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