Probe into US soldier's killing of Iraqi

A US occupation soldier who may have thought he was putting a seriously wounded Iraqi out of his misery by killing him, is now the subject of an inquiry.

    'Mercy killing' is a potential breach of US engagement rules

    The US Army has opened a

    criminal investigation against the US soldier who fatally shot

    at close range an Iraqi man who was already grievously wounded

    in a vehicle after a high-speed chase near the city of Kufa,

    US Central Command said on Friday. 

     

    The Army Criminal Investigation Command will look into

    whether the US soldier, from the 1st Armored Division, shot t

    he Iraqi in the May 21 incident to try to end the man's

    suffering from serious wounds, officials said.

     

    One official said soldiers "don't get to make those kinds

    of decisions", and Central Command called the incident "a

    potential violation of US rules of engagement".

     

    In a statement, Central Command said US forces came

    across a motorcade in which the Iraqi was driving one of the

    vehicles. Central Command did not specify the nature of the

    motorcade.

     

    "A high-speed chase ensued and during the course of the

    encounter, the Iraqi vehicle was engaged with gunfire. The

    driver was seriously injured and a passenger was less seriously

    wounded. Reports indicate that the injured driver was shot at

    close range by a US soldier and died," according to the

    statement.

     

    Central Command officials declined to identify the soldier

    under investigation even by rank, and offered no details on the

    dead Iraqi. 

    SOURCE: Reuters


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