Bali attack sympathiser jailed

An Indonesian who shielded a key member of the Bali bombings plot has been jailed for nine years.

    More than 200 people were killed in the blast at the Sari nightclub

    His was the last in a series of trials arising from the atrocity that left 202 people dead.

    Judges at Denpasar district court on the holiday island said on Thursday that Achmad Roichan was "guilty of the crime of intentionally providing facilities to a terrorism suspect by hiding information on the suspect."

    Prosecutors had sought a 20-year sentence for Roichan, who hid a man called Mukhlas while he was on the run after the nightclub blasts in October 2002 which killed mostly Western tourists.

    The court has jailed more than 30 people for their roles in the worst terror attack since September 11, 2001 in the United States.

    Mukhlas, Imam Samudra and Amrozi are appealing against death sentences. Four others were given life sentences and the remainder received jail terms ranging from 16 years to three years.

    Marriott bombing

    A man called Idris who was also allegedly involved in the Bali blasts will face trial in Jakarta, a court official said. This is because Idris was also allegedly involved in the Marriott bombing in the capital last August which killed 12 people.

    The al-Qaida-linked Jemaah Islamiyah is blamed for the Bali and Marriott attacks along with a series of other bombings in recent years.

    Several key Bali suspects are still being hunted, including Malaysian explosives experts Noordin Mohammad Top and Azahari Husin.

    SOURCE: AFP


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