Bidding opens for Iraq war opponents

The United States says France and other countries opposed to the war against Iraq will be allowed to bid for reconstruction projects in the war-torn country.

    Canada's Paul Martin (L) has vowed to thaw ties with the US

    The announcement came from the White House on Tuesday shortly after President George Bush said that Canada would also be able to bid for an estimated $18.6 billion worth of contracts.

    The previous US position was that only those countries whose troops were also occupying Iraq would be eligible for bidding on the projects, although US officials had signalled some flexibility after an international outcry.
     
    Appearing with new Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin, Bush said he told Martin that Canadian firms would be eligible to bid on major projects when a second round is awarded.

    Martin welcomed the change, describing the change as "quite significant".

    They were speaking on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas in Mexico.

    US punishment

    The second round of contracts is expected to include about $6 billion in non-construction work to rebuild Iraq, likely including equipment, democracy-building projects and grants. Bidding should begin in a few weeks. 

    Iraq's reconstruction efforts are
    worth some $18.6 billion

    Last week, bidding began on about $5 billion in major construction contracts.

    Bush had effectively punished war opponents like Canada, France, Germany and Russia a month ago by banning them from bidding on lucrative reconstruction projects for Iraq.

    At the time he said: "Our people risked their lives. Friendly coalition folks risked their lives and ... the contracting is going to reflect that." 

    The shift followed an acknowledgment by US officials that they would like to put the bitter Iraq war debate in the past and patch up relations with key allies.
     
    The contracts controversy exploded just as presidential envoy James Baker was departing on a mission to gain European support for forgiving some of Iraq's $120 billion in foreign debt. France and Germany pledged substantial debt relief.
     
    Canada was angered by the fact it has contributed $240 million C$300 million to reconstruction efforts in Iraq and sent 2000 soldiers to Afghanistan.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Take a tour through East and West Jerusalem to see the difference in quality of life for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.