Taliban rockets hit Kabul

Taliban have claimed responsibility for a rocket attack on Afghanistan's capital, hours before constitution talks are set to resume.

    Security at the constitution talks is taken very seriously

    A senior security official said the rockets hit the Afghani capital early on Tuesday morning at about 02:00 (21:30 GMT Monday).

    One rocket landed west of Kabul's international airport, hitting the bathroom of a house.

    There were no casualties, according to security chief Baba Jan - who did not yet know the location of the second explosion.
       
    Jan also told journalists the attacks took place hours before delegates of the Loya Jirga were due to resume debate on ratifying the country's new constitution.

    Claiming responsibility

    A spokesman for Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack.

    "We warn more attacks on Kabul city today and tonight," the spokesman said, identifying himself as Abd al-Samad.
      
    The airport is several kilometers away from Kabul's polytechnic institute where the 500-delegate assembly to hammer out Afghanistan's constitution is underway.

    Possible third rocket

    However, a statement by the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) said three explosions were heard after midnight.
      
    "We can confirm that between 00:30 and 01:00 on Tuesday … up to three explosions were detected in the environs of Kabul," the statement said.
      
    "There are no reports of casualties or damage to ISAF installations at this time," it added.

    SOURCE: Reuters


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.