Mortar attack kills two US soldiers in Iraq

Two US occupation soldiers have been killed and four others wounded in a mortar attack on an army base near Baquba, northeast of Baghdad.

    A total of 206 US soldiers have been killed since 1 May

    "Two Task Force Ironhorse soldiers were killed in a mortar attack at approximately 6:15 pm (15:15 GMT) (on Thursday)," said Major Josslyn Aberle on Friday.

    "Four additional soldiers were wounded in the attack. All are in stable condition," she added.

    The 32,000-strong Taskforce Ironhorse, responsible for the provinces of Diyala, Taamim, and Saddam Hussein's home province of Salahuddin, is headed by the 4th Infantry Division.

    Baquba, 60 kms from Baghdad, remains a battlefront in the persistent resistance attacks dogging the eight-month-old US-led occupation.

    A mortar attack on the main US base in Baquba in October struck the compound's recreation centre, wounding about a dozen soldiers.

    The death raises to 206 the number of US soldiers killed in action in Iraq since US President George Bush declared major combat over on 1 May.

    Polish soldiers ambushed

    Fighters also wounded two Polish soldiers in an ambush in
    southern Iraq, the latest in a string of attacks on the forces
    of countries which have answered Washington's call for troops to help it secure the country it invaded to topple Saddam Hussein.

    A Polish-led division of multinational troops said the Polish troops were attacked on Thursday night with bombs and small arms fire near Mahawil, about 80 kms  south of the capital. 

    "Their injuries are not life-threatening," a spokesman for the division said.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    The peace games: Dreaming big for South Sudan's youth

    A relatively new independence and fresh waves of conflict inspire a South Sudanese refugee to build antiwar video games.