Pakistan opens skies to India

Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf announced his country would end a ban on Indian flights over its territory.

    New Dehli's planes may soon be seen over rival Pakistan

    The official news agency APP quoted Musharraf on Sunday as saying the move was a “goodwill gesture” in advance of talks with India in New Delhi next week.

    The announcement came a few days after the nuclear-armed rivals began a ceasefire along the military line of control (LOC), which divides disputed Kashmir between the two.

    Pakistan and India have gone to war three times since they won independence from Britain in 1947, twice over Kashmir, which both claim. They went to the brink of a fourth war last year.

    Outside pressure

    After coming under international pressure, particularly the United States, they began  peace overtures in recent months. Full diplomatic relations had been established and bus services restarted.

    Aviation officials of the two countries are due to hold talks next week in New Delhi on resuming air links and related topics.

    Musharraf expressed hope that the recent thaw between New Delhi and Islamabad would culminate in the resolution of all disputes.

    “Pakistan is sincere in its efforts for peace in the region,” Musharraf was quoted as saying.

    India has so far refused to resume peace talks, saying Pakistan must end support for Kashmiri fighters rebelling against its rule. Islamabad denies the Indian charges and accuses New Delhi of rights abuses in Kashmir.

      

    SOURCE: Reuters


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