Saudi dissident rejects al-Qaida

Well-known Saudi dissident Shaikh Nasir bin Hamad al-Fahd has become the country’s second radical cleric to repent and denounce a deadly suicide bombing in Riyadh in less than a week.

    The al-Muhaya bombing was the latest in a string of Saudi attacks

    “Several of our fatwas (religious edicts) and our declarations enacted hatred and contained other issues about which we were deceived ... That is why I renounce several of these fatwas,” said al-Fahd in an interview on state television.

    The Shaikh says he requested the interview.
      
    Al-Fahd's about-turn is the second this week after fellow religious leader Shaikh Ali bin Khudair al-Khudair withdrew religious edicts and support for 19 al-Qaida suspects on state television on Monday.
      
    Both men were arrested and released for supporting the Saudi militants wanted by the authorities, and al-Khudair urged the remaining suspects to give themselves up. 

    Haram 
      
    Following Khudair's example, al-Fahd also denounced the 8 November bombing of the al-Muhaya residential compound in the Saudi capital.

    “By no means do we approve of such acts ... Those who kill Muslims and children cannot pretend it is in the name of jihad”

    Shaikh Nasir bin Hamad al-Fahd

    “The al-Muhaya blast was a very big shock for me in that it took place during Ramadan,” the Muslim holy month of fasting, he said.

    “By no means do we approve of such acts ... Those who kill Muslims and children cannot pretend it is in the name of jihad (holy war),” he said, stressing that those who blow themselves up are “not martyrs ... it is suicide.”

    Suicide is haram, or forbidden, in Islam. 

    Rejection
      
    Speaking about Usama bin Ladin's call to expel non-Muslim foreigners from Muslim countries, al-Fahd said he was against any attack against expatriates living in the oil-rich Saudi kingdom.

    He called it forbidden to take up arms against Jews and Christians in order to eject them from Arabia.
      
    The al-Qaida group claimed the 8 November suicide car bombing against a residential compound in Riyadh which killed 17 and wounded 122 others. Most of the victims were Arabs.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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