Phone uses finger as earpiece

A Japanese company has invented the world's first wristwatch phone which works by transforming the user's finger into an earpiece.

    Sound travels through the bone in the form of vibrations

    According to the New Scientist which is publishing the story next week, the prototype gadget is called Finger Whisper.

     

    It consists of a wristband that converts digital signals into vibrations that are transmitted into the bones of the hand.

      

    The user puts his finger into his ear for the vibrations to be picked up by the eardrum, which then transcribes them back into sound signals for the brain.

      

    To talk, he or she simply speaks into a microphone on the wristband.

      

    By touching forefinger to thumb, the user starts or ends a call, and uses voice recognition technology to dial the number. There is no keypad.

      

    Japanese telecommunications giant NTT DoCoMo is developing the idea, which is the brainchild of a research engineer, Masaaki Fukumoto.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    How different voting systems work around the world

    How different voting systems work around the world

    Nearly two billion voters in 52 countries around the world will head to the polls this year to elect their leaders.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    The great plunder: Nepal's stolen treasures

    How the art world's hunger for ancient artefacts is destroying a centuries-old culture. A journey across the Himalayas.