Siegfried and Roy show to go on

Illusionists Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn plan to continue with their show, despite Horn's critical injuries after being savaged by a white Bengal tiger in their Las Vegas act last week.

    The white tiger was a signature part of their act

    Fischbacher said Horn was showing progress after sustaining injuries from the 3 October tiger bite and a following stroke. Horn was opening his eyes and flashing a thumbs-up sign, Fischbacher said in an interview with NBC television, Reuters reported.

    “Now I'm just concerned with one thing, that Roy get healthy and be on my side again,” Fischbacher, half of the legendary "Siegfried and Roy" duo, said.

    “We started this together 44 years ago, and we're going to stop this together. I always said for over 40 years, the show must go on - and it will,” he said. “The show is our life, and the life is our show.”

    Magicians of the century
      
    Named "Magicians of the Century" in 2000 by the International Magicians Society, Fischbacher and Horn have performed to nearly 50 million people in their 44-year career.

    The pair met on a cruise ship in the 1950s, when Fischbacher was serving as a steward and Horn was working as a waiter.

    “We started this together 44 years ago, and we're going to stop this together. I always said for over 40 years, the show must go on - and it will”

    Siegfried Fischbacher,
    one half of the legendary "Siegfried and Roy" duo

    The pair's first break came when they performed at Monte Carlo's world-famous casino. Someone in the audience who worked for the “Folies Bergere” caught up with them in Spain and asked if they were interested in taking their act to Las Vegas.

    They have been performing there for more than three decades.

    Cat will live
      
    Earlier in the week, Fischbacher told CNN television that they had no plans to destroy Montecore, the tiger that attacked Horn.
      
    “It is Roy's wish that no one hurts him. He will remain part of our family,” he said.
      
    “If Montecore had wanted to kill him, he would have shaken his head, and it would have all been over,” Fischbacher told reporters in Los Angeles after the CNN show.
      
    "The tiger did nothing wrong. He's still part of the family."

    Confused cat

    The rare white tigers, which the men raise from cubs, are a signature part of their act.

    “The cat was just in a confusion,” Fischbacher told NBC Thursday.

    “It was not an attack of a cat. It was an accident. And the cat knew in all this commotion that there was something wrong, there was something not right,” and wanted to protect himself and Roy.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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