US forces come under Afghan attack

US-led forces have come under attack in southern Afghanistan before the second anniversary of the American invasion of the country.

    American-led forces regularly ambushed in southern Afghanistan

    The US military said their troops suffered no casualties in the attacks in four provinces on Saturday and Sunday, but one resistance fighter was killed.

    The attacks in Khost, Paktika, Nangarhar and Kandahar provinces follow the bloodiest period in Afghanistan since the overthrow of the Taliban in late 2001, in which more than 300 people have been killed since the start of August.

    They came before Tuesday's anniversary of the start of US bombing of Afghanistan on 7 October 2001, and during a weekend visit by Deputy Secretary of State, Richard Armitage.

    Ambushed

    A statement from the US military said US-led forces conducting an offensive operation near their base at Khost were ambushed by small-arms fire on Saturday, but suffered no casualties.

    On Sunday, a special forces unit on patrol near its base at Orgun-e engaged a 15-strong force, killing one of them in a 30-minute fight after coming under rocket-grenade and small-arms fire.

    Hamid Karzai is the only Pashtun
    member of government 

    Elsewhere in the south, bases of US-led forces in Jalalabad and Kandahar came under rocket attack on Sunday, but the missiles caused no damage or casualties.  

    On Sunday, the Afghan government and the United States played down the upsurge in Taliban attacks in recent months, with Armitage saying recent activity showed the fighters were "frightened".

    Disgruntlement

    Afghan Foreign Minister, Abd Allah Abd Allah, said Afghanistan still had problems with security, but the incidents that had occurred often presented a false picture of the overall situation.

    He said there had been great improvements since two years ago, when Taliban-ruled Afghanistan was the centre of global destabilisation and home to al-Qaida.

    However, Aljazeera's correspondent in Afghanistan says the country's Pashtun-majority, which is based in the south and east, remains disgruntled because of a lack of political representation.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Interactive: Take a tour through divided Jerusalem

    Take a tour through East and West Jerusalem to see the difference in quality of life for Israelis and Palestinians.

    Stories from the sex trade

    Stories from the sex trade

    Dutch sex workers, pimps and johns share their stories.

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    Inside the world of India's booming fertility industry

    As the stigma associated with being childless persists, some elderly women in India risk it all to become mothers.