Korean typhoon leaves scores dead

At least 84 people are now known to have died in the powerful typhoon that wrenched parts of South Korea on Saturday.

    The typhoon was the worst to hit South Korea since 1904

    Packing winds up to 216 kms per hour, Typhoon Maemi crashed into South Korea's southern provinces, triggering landslides and flash floods.

    Before heading back to the sea to exhaust its fury, the gale left behind a huge trail of destruction.

    Emergency officials cautioned the final toll could jump further as communications gradually are restored with battered regions in the interiors.

    The typhoon derailed trains, broke up ships, knocked off electric transmission lines and plunged 1.5 million people into darkness.

    Battered and numbed, the authorities on Sunday mobilised 5000 soldiers to help relief operations. President Roh Moo-Hyun approved a special budget of $1.28 billion to aid recovery efforts.


    The typhoon derailed trains, broke up ships, knocked off electric transmission lines and plunged 1.5 million people into darkness

    Officials, however, said the task at hand was difficult and huge.

    Damage

    The typhoon caused damage estimated at $12.9 billion to power facilities.

    "It will take several days to recover power transmission lines," a ministry official said.

    Television footage showed a row of seaside restaurants in Busan destroyed by waves whipped up by the typhoon.

    In cities and towns, the gale overturned cars and twisted electric poles, besides snapping power lines and uprooting trees. Flash floods washed away several roads.

     

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Unification: Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem

    Unification: Saladin and the Fall of Jerusalem

    We explore how Salah Ed-Din unified the Muslim states and recaptured the holy city of Jerusalem from the crusaders.