Web tribute to Abd al-Nasir

Gamal Abd al-Nasir’s daughter has launched a new website containing all the speeches of the late Egyptian president.

    Gamal Abd al-Nasir: A political giant of the 20th century

    Speaking to journalists on Sunday, Huda said her goal was to reach as many young people as possible, enabling them to understand his views on Arab nationalism and social justice.

    The website,

    www.nasser.org

    , contains more than 8000 pages of speeches, 1200 radio broadcasts and even television broadcasts from between 1960 and 1970 – a mass of information that took her three years to compile.
      
    The site also contains a bibliography and documents from British archives about her world famous father.
      
    Huda claims that since Abd al-Nasir’s death on 28 September 1970, his speeches have been neither published nor discussed in the Egyptian media.

    Remembering

    Backed by the military, Gamal Abd al-Nasir overthrew the Egyptian monarchy on 23 July 1952 and founded a republican government.
      
    A charismatic leader who espoused Arab nationalism, he is remembered for having nationalised the Suez Canal and the Egyptian industry while developing a one-party system of government.
      
    During his presidency, Egypt and its allies lost the 1967 war with Israel.

    Legacy

    Today, the party that bears his name is just a small opposition group in Egypt.

    The cause of Arab socialism he championed has few strong adherents, but his legacy still casts a shadow over Egypt and other Arab countries.
      
    Six years ago, the film "Nasir 56" - about the dramatic events in the year he nationalised the Franco-British Suez Canal Company - was a box office hit in Cairo, Beirut, Damascus and many other Arab capitals.
      
    It has also been screened on television from Morocco to the Gulf.
      
    Although remembered fondly by most in Egypt, a minority have denounced the later years of his presidency as a crushing failure – blaming him for a legacy of Arab political and military weakness as well as one of economic distress in Egypt.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Interactive: How does your country vote at the UN?

    Explore how your country voted on global issues since 1946, as the world gears up for the 74th UN General Assembly.

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    'We were forced out by the government soldiers'

    We dialled more than 35,000 random phone numbers to paint an accurate picture of displacement across South Sudan.

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Interactive: Plundering Cambodia's forests

    Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia's timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.