'Saddam's bunker' never existed says report

An underground bunker in Baghdad which the United States said it targetted to kill Saddam Hussein on the first night of the Iraq invasion never existed.

     

    US missiles hit hoax target

    US television channel “CBS News” reported that teams which have searched the site since the fall of the Iraqi president have found no trace of the bunker or any bodies.

     

    US fighter planes hit the Dora Farms complex in southern Baghdad with bombs and cruise missiles on 20 March.

      

    "When we came out here the primary thing we were looking for was an underground facility, or bodies, forensics," CBS quoted Colonel Tim Madere, the head of the search operation as saying.

      

    The search team only saw giant holes created by the bombs but no underground facilities or bodies.

      

    CBS said it was the first news organisation to visit Dora Farms. It reported that every structure in the compound was destroyed except the main palace, which was hidden behind a wall topped by electrified barbed wire.

     

    Intelligence failure

     

    The windows of the palace had been blown out and the place was in a shambles. But anybody who could have been in the house could have survived, the report said.

      

    The US Air Force dropped four 900 kilogramme bombs on the site because intelligence said there was a bunker complex hidden beneath the buildings. But Madere has yet to find it.

      

    The compound has been searched three times, once by the Central Intelligence Agency and twice by Madere, who is trying to find traces of Saddam Hussein’s DNA to see if he has been killed.

      

    The fate of the Iraqi leader and his family remain unknown.

     

    After the raid, US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld insisted that the strike had been "successful". Other military leaders said that if Saddam Hussein had been in the bunker he would probably have been killed.


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    'We scoured for days without sleeping, just clothes on our backs'

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    Daughters of al-Shabab

    What draws Kenyan women to join al-Shabab and what challenges are they facing when they return to their communities?