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Your Views: Negotiating Gaddafi's exit
Should the Libyan rebels agree to a negotiated settlement with the Gaddafi regime that leaves any Gaddafi in power?
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2011 15:58

A concerted diplomatic effort by Muammar Gaddafi's government to end the country's civil conflict has run into major hurdles. The Libyan opposition says it rejects any proposal that would leave Gaddafi or his sons in power.

"This war has shown everyone and the world that Gaddafi's sons are no different from him," Iman Bughaigis, the opposition spokeswoman, said in Benghazi. "They are two sides of the same coin."

"Gaddafi has been waging a war on our people with the help of his sons' militias and mercenaries, so we see no difference between them. There is no way to negotiate with this regime."

On Monday, a government spokesperson said the Libyan government is ready to negotiate reforms, such as elections or a referendum, but that only the people can decide whether Gaddafi should stay on.

"We could have any political system, any changes: constitution, election, anything, but the leader has to lead this forward. This is our belief," Musa Ibrahim, the Libyan information minister, told reporters on Tuesday.

He said no conditions could be imposed on Libya from abroad, even though the country was ready to discuss proposals aimed at bringing more democracy, transparency, press freedom and anti-corruption laws.

Should the Libyan rebels agree to a negotiated settlement with the Gaddafi regime that leaves either the Colonel or his sons in power?

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