[QODLink]
Weather
Elections and the weather
States across the northeast scramble to keep the elections on track
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2012 09:08

Washington DC extended polling hours to ensure people affected by Sandy could vote [AFP]

Weather on Election Day across the United States is always an important consideration. Reasoning would lead you to believe that the better the weather, the better the voter turnout.

But does a particular party benefit from “bad” weather? One study done in the Journal of Politics found that when bad weather was a factor for voter turnout, it tended to be in favour of the Republican candidate, up to 2.5% for each inch of rain.

For Tuesday’s elections, most of the country will see above average temperatures and fair skies, except for the northeast where there could be a wintry mix and lower than average temperatures.

For the states of New York and New Jersey, it is the devastation caused by Sandy that could be the major hitch in the elections.

In New Jersey alone, 3,000 polling sites are still expected to be without electricity. The Army will be filling in the gaps by providing trucks outfitted so that residents in the affected areas can still place their ballots.

New York and New Jersey are both considered Obama strongholds, but because of the widespread damage Sandy caused, some are speculating whether the results from these two states could put a delay on the final results.


242

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Residents count the cost of violence after black American teenager shot dead by white Missouri police officer.
EU's poorest member state is struggling to cope with an influx of mostly war-weary Syrian refugees.
Study says tipping point reached as poachers kill 7 percent of African elephants annually; birth rate is 5 percent.
Zimbabwe's leader given rotating chairmanship of 15-member nation bloc a year after he won disputed presidential polls.
Government regulations and security fears are choking the once thriving industry in India-administered Kashmir.
join our mailing list