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Tourists feel the heat at Taj Mahal
Tourists visiting monument have been experiencing a heat wave, with temperatures reaching up to 47C degrees.
Last Modified: 16 May 2011 14:19
The elderly and infants are at most risk and need to stay properly hydrated and cooled frequently [EPA]

One of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World has been a difficult place for tourists to behold.

The Taj Majal, in the Indian city of Agra, has been experiencing a heat wave with temperatures reaching up to 47C degrees.

Tourists visiting the monument find it extremely hard to shelter themselves from the sun or even find adequate water facilities. 

Rejeev Sexena, executive committee member of Tourism Guild of Agra, said, "Monuments are open but there is no shade available, there are no covered walkways and water facilities are very poor. 

"Now it is urgently required that these kinds of facilities are provided, so that even in summer time, when summer vacation is here, these people who come in from distant area to Agra can have an enjoyable experience".

In conditions such as these, heat ailments such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke tend to soar. 

The elderly and infants are at most risk and need to stay properly hydrated and cooled frequently. 

Weather officials are advising people not to venture out into the sun between 12 and 4pm local time as well as protecting themselves from the direct sun with scarves and umbrellas. 

The onset of the southwest monsoon will help to break the temperatures as well as bring in more clouds, but is not normally scheduled to begin until the end of May with Agra seeing the relief weeks after that.

Source:
Agencies
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