[QODLink]
Weather
Warmer spring forecast for Japan
Power shortages expected as temperatures rise in country reeling from tsunami damage to nuclear-power station.
Last Modified: 25 Apr 2011 14:35

 

The tsunami havoc is likely to be felt well into the summer once demand for energy surges across Japan [GETTY]

The Japanese Meteorological Agency has just released its seasonal forecast for the country. For the months of May to July, Japan is expecting to see hotter-than-average weather.

This includes the eastern region, with is partly served by the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), whose Fukushima nuclear-power station was crippled by the earthquake-and-tsunami havoc of March 11.

And, of course, with hotter weather comes the increased demand for airconditioning usage and electricity.

First of all, let us break down what the average high temperatures would be for that region from May-July.  With that, let us add in the normal humidity percentage to get a heat index temperature.

That is the apparent feel of the air to your skin. The higher the heat index temperature, the harder it is to cool your body.

For May the average high for the region is 23C and the average humidity is 63%, giving us an expected heat index of 25C.

By the time we get to July, these numbers climb to a July average high of 29C, an average humidity of 76%, calculating to an expected heat index of around 34C.

If you raise these seasonal averages based on the long-term forecast, we are then talking about temperatures starting in the high 20sC reaching into the mid to high 30sC by the end of July.

These are temperatures with humidity levels that will be especially hard on the sick and the elderly.

The damaged plants of TEPCO, Asia’s largest utility, expect to be able to supply 52,000 megawatts (MW) of power by the end of July.

This will be slightly less than its projected demand of 55,000MW.  But last summer when Japan recorded its hottest summer on record, power usage peaked at 60,000MW. 

In order to fulfil the need of electric consumption with expected above average temperatures, the government is looking to curb the usage this summer of big manufacturers.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.