Women used as bargaining chips in South Sudan customary courts

A strike by judges in South Sudan means more people are turning to customary courts to settle legal issues.

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    A strike by judges in South Sudan means more people are turning to customary courts to settle legal issues.

    Such courts focus more on settling disputes without disrupting peace and coexistence in communities.

    But because the verdicts are based on traditional laws and norms, justice, especially for women, is not always achieved.

    Al Jazeera's Hiba Morgan reports from Juba.


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