Egypt to mark protest anniversary

Egypt looks set to face more unrest on second anniversary of deadly street protests in capital Cairo.

    Egypt looks set to face more unrest on the second anniversary of deadly street protests in the capital, Cairo.

    At least 40 people had died and hundreds were wounded during confrontations with security forces on Mohamed Mahmoud street on November 20, 2011, and the protests became an important milestone for post-Hosni Mubarak Egypt, leading to the first democratic presidential elections.

    The elections, which led to a Muslim Brotherhood-dominated government taking power, led to protests of their own, finally resulting in a July 3 military coup that saw President Mohamed Morsi ousted from power.

    On Monday night, the foundation for a future memorial to Egyptian protesters killed in the country's uprising was damaged by a group of demonstrators denouncing both the Muslim Brotherhood and the military that ousted the group from power.

    Unknown assailants attacked, chipped away and sprayed graffiti on the huge stone early on Tuesday, just hours after it was inaugurated by the country's interim prime minister.

    The overnight attack underscores the deep divisions plaguing the country since the 2011 uprising that toppled Mubarak.

    Adly 'not to run'

    Meanwhile, Adly Mansour, the country's interim head of state, has announced that he is not intending to run for the presidency when fresh elections take place next year.

    Speaking to Kuwaiti newspaper al-Seyassah, Mansour said that he would return to his previous post as head of the country's constitutional court, a position he continues to hold in addition to the interim presidency, which he assumed after Morsi was toppled.

    Asked if he planned to run in the elections, Mansour said: "No... No, I will return to my office and my work at the constitutional court."

    Under the current political roadmap, Mansour will remain head of the interim government until presidential elections are held, due to follow parliamentary polls and the approval of amendments to the suspended constitution in a referendum.

    In an interview earlier this month, Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said parliamentary elections would take place in February or March, with presidential polls slated for early summer.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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