Morsi struggles to make foreign policy mark

Egyptian president's status as a regional power broker has been eclipsed by instability at home.

    Mohammed Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president, seemed eager to make his mark on foreign policy when he came to power nearly a year ago.

    Morsi visited Iran in a first for an Egyptian leader in more than three decades since the two countries broke ties.

    He tried to join Iran, Turkey Egypt and Saudi Arabia into a quartet of regional powers to help resolve the Syrian crisis, but with minimal success.

    Egypt's status as a regional powerhouse has been eclipsed by instability at home.

    Al Jazeera's Rawya Rageh reports from Cairo.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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